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Charitable Income Tax Deductions: The Rockefeller Edition

March 29, 2017

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Billionaire David Rockefeller passed away this week at the age of 101.  According to Forbes magazine, during his lifetime, the well-known philanthropist gave away nearly $2 billion.

In light of this newsworthy charitable donation, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

Section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) governs income tax deductions for charitable contributions. In the case of an individual making a cash gift to a Section 501(c)(3) organization classified as a “public charity” (such as churches, schools, hospitals, and governmental units), the gift is deductible for federal income tax purposes so long as the aggregate gifts do not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income (“AGI”) for the taxable year.

In the case of a contribution of capital gain property to a public charity, a taxpayer can only deduct

Review of Income Tax Deduction Rules for Charitable Gifts

August 22, 2016

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People.com is reporting that Amber Heard, who received a $7 million settlement in her divorce from Johnny Depp this week, is donating the entire $7 million settlement to charities with “a particular focus to stop violence against women” as well as the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles.

In light of this newsworthy charitable donation, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

Section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) governs income tax deductions for charitable contributions. In the case of an individual making a cash gift to a Section 501(c)(3) organization classified as a “public charity” (such as churches, schools, hospitals, and governmental units), the gift is deductible for federal income tax purposes so long as the aggregate gifts do not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income (“AGI”) for the

Treasury Green Book Proposals — Private Foundations

March 8, 2016

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The Department of the Treasury has released the Treasury Green Book  for Fiscal Year 2017, which provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning, if passed, is found on page 240 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

REFORM EXCISE TAX BASED ON INVESTMENT INCOME OF PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS

Current Law

Private foundations that are exempt from Federal income tax generally are subject to a two percent excise tax on their net investment income. The excise tax rate is reduced to one percent in any year in which the foundation’s distributions for charitable purposes exceed the average level of the foundation’s charitable distributions over the five preceding taxable years (with certain adjustments). Private foundations that are not exempt from Federal income tax, including certain charitable trusts, must pay an excise tax equal

Bryan Cave Trusts and Estates Practice Receives National and Metropolitan First Tier Rankings by U.S. News & World Report

November 19, 2014

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U.S. News and Best Lawyers have joined to rank more than 12,000 firms in the U.S. in 120 practice areas in 174 metropolitan areas and 8 states.

Bryan Cave’s Trust and Estates Practice Group (“Private Client CSG”) received National First Tier Ranking and the Atlanta, Kansas City, Orange County, and St. Louis offices all received First Tier Rankings in metropolitan cities.

Congratulations to the Private Client Group!

The 2015 report of more than 12,000 firms by practice area is based on a rigorous evaluation process that includes the collection of client and lawyer evaluations, peer review from leading attorneys in their field and review of additional information provided by law firms as part of the formal submission process. Results were combined into an overall “Best Law Firms” score for each firm.

Charitable Gifts to Supporting Organizations

February 28, 2014

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As we discussed in our prior post, Review of Income Tax Deduction Rules for Charitable Gifts, an income tax deduction up to fifty percent (50%) of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income is allowed for gifts to public charities of non-capital gain property and up to thirty percent (30%) for gifts of capital gain property.  These same contribution limits apply to gifts to supporting organizations.

What is a supporting organization?  Supporting organizations are described in Section 509(a)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code as charities that carry out their exempt purposes by supporting other public charities.  A supporting organization generally warrants public charity status because it has a relationship with its supported organization sufficient to ensure that the supported organization is effectively supervising or paying particular attention to the operations of the supporting organization.

IRD, IRD, IRD is the Word: IRD Consequences of IRA Distribution to Charities

October 16, 2013

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From TrustBryanCave.com

Once again, the Internal Revenue Service reminds us in PLR 201330011 that a distribution from an IRA to a residuary beneficiary will not result in recognition of IRD (also known as income in respect of a decedent) to the estate or trust, as only the residuary beneficiary will recognize the IRD.

Here the Decedent’s Estate was the beneficiary of the Decedent’s IRA. Under the provisions of the Decedent’s Will, his Estate poured over to his Revocable Trust on his death. His Revocable Trust provided that each of two Charities were to receive a percentage of the residue of his Trust, and further provided that the Trustee could satisfy this percentage gift in cash or in kind and also could allocate different assets to different residuary beneficiaries in satisfaction of their percentage interest in the trust residue.

Of course, the IRA constitutes income in respect of a decedent

Effects of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 on Estate Planning

January 4, 2013

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Unless you have been living on a tropical island with no television, cell service, or internet for the past few days, you have probably heard that the Federal government passed a new law this week, averting the “fiscal cliff” by the skin of their teeth (well, at least with respect to tax reform, it remains to be seen what will happen with spending cuts). While there are many portions of the “American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012” (the “2012 Act”) that may apply to you (for example, see our prior post on the effects of the 2012 Act on charitable gifting), our focus now is on how the new law affects your estate planning.

IRS Issues Chief Counsel Advice 201208026

March 8, 2012

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Late last month, the IRS released Chief Counsel Advice 201208026, which relates to gifts by the grantors of a crummey trust to the trust. The IRS held that the grantors had made completed gifts and that the withdrawal rights under the trust were unenforceable and illusory and, therefore, no annual exclusion was allowable with respect to the gifts.

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